CONTACT

 

Knights Lab

MCB 6-124

420 Washington Ave SE

Minneapolis, MN 55455

(612) 5-MICROB (612-564-2762)

dknights@umn.edu

ABOUT

 

Dr. Dan Knights is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering and the Biotechnology Institute at the University of Minnesota. The Knights lab models host-microbiome interactions in human disease, with labs in Minneapolis and Saint Paul. Knights is a PI with the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

© 2013-2014 Knights Lab, University of Minnesota

Official fastest time

 

Dr. Knights's official personal record of 11.93 seconds.

Meeting Erno Rubik

 

Dr. Knights: "I began to post my progress on my web page, and several months later, in the fall of 1999, I received an email from a TV producer for a British morning show called, "The Big Breakfast." She told me that Erno Rubik was coming to their talk show, and that they wanted a few speedcubers to be on the show with him. When I agreed to come, she replied, "Okay, great. Are you in London, and can you be at the studio Tuesday morning?" It was Friday, and I was in Vermont. After some deliberation, I eventually replied, "yes, I'm in London, and I can definitely be there." I then found a cheap flight to London, and four days later I was on the show with Rubik.

 

During the filming, I noticed two women offstage who where pointing at me. When the show ended, they introduced themselves as Rubik's public relations team. It turned out that Rubik was at the start of a week-long publicity tour around England, and they liked the idea of having a young speed-cuber beside him for the TV appearances. They invited me to come with them for the week, and we all headed off to Rubik's hotel. Over the next few days, we did a number of talk shows and news interviews (ITV news, Granada Tonight Show, etc.), several radio shows, and a few newspaper interviews. Rubik was friendly, though generally quiet and pensive. He solved my cube."

Freefall speedcubing

 

Dr. Knights: "By the spring of 2000, I was averaging around 18 seconds. Over the next couple of years, I dropped down to 16.8. I made a few other TV appearances, including a reunion show of, "That's Incredible." I also made two somewhat embarassing solution videos for Rubiks.com, and solved a cube during freefall for a pilot show on VH1.

 

In 2004 I became a high school math teacher, and put the cube aside for about 2 years. In 2006, I began speedsolving again, and learning the new "state of art" solving techniques. I have gotten my best average down to 13.82 seconds (as of June, 2007)."

Dr. Knights speedsolving Rubik's Cube during freefall on a pilot show for VH1.

Dr. Knights: "My eerie drawing from 7th grade, 8 years before I became obsessed with Rubik's cube."

Links

Dan Knights. Rubik's Cube: 7-Step Solution Guide.

Packaged with Rubik's Cube. Copyright 2003. Booklet. Over 1 million copies in print.

 

Dan Knights. "The Most Concise Understandable Solution to Rubik's Cube Ever" (using group theory), Copyright 2006.

 

Dan Knights. "Revolving Door Solution", Copyright 2005.

 

Dr. Knights's 2010 essay on the cube.

 

 

Links, tips, stories, and videos related to speedsolving Rubik's Cube.

SPEEDCUBING.