CONTACT

 

Knights Lab

MCB 6-124

420 Washington Ave SE

Minneapolis, MN 55455

(612) 5-MICROB (612-564-2762)

dknights@umn.edu

ABOUT

 

Dr. Dan Knights is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering and the Biotechnology Institute at the University of Minnesota. The Knights lab models host-microbiome interactions in human disease, with labs in Minneapolis and Saint Paul. Knights is a PI with the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

© 2013-2014 Knights Lab, University of Minnesota

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March 25, 2016

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Recent Posts

Immigrant Microbiome paper published in Cell

November 9, 2018

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Register for the Microbiome Symposium

March 29, 2015

Please register for the upcoming Microbiome Symposium on April 17th. The theme is "Microbial Diversity and Health." The event is free but we are requiring registration to help with organization and food orders. Here is a link to the registration form:

 

http://goo.gl/forms/PIqnYy6Rby

 

Note: we will have time for poster presentations and drinks from 4-5PM, so please indicate if you can present a poster.

 

Click here for the full schedule and details. We hope you can attend! We have an exciting line-up of speakers, including:

 

Dr. Marty Blaser, NYU Langone Medical Center

Dr. Maria Gloria Dominguez-Bello, NYU Langone Medical Center

Dr. Michael Sadowsky, University of Minnesota

Dr. Alex Khoruts, University of Minnesota

Dr. Cheryl Gale, Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Medical School

Dr. Kenny Beckman, University of Minnesota

 

A few words on our external speakers:

 

 

Marty recently wrote an interesting book, The Missing Microbes, that describes his hypothesis that our medical and societal practices are causing the loss of important human microbial symbionts on a global scale and potentially contributing to the rise in chronic metabolic and autoimmune diseases.

 

Maria Gloria Dominguez-Bello established that the initial human microbiome is inoculated through the birth canal, and is also doing fascinating work on indigenous human populations with minimal exposure to modern society.

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